Analogue Journey — Part 1: The Digital Catalyst

Analogue Journey — Part 1: The Digital Catalyst

Articles
About four months ago I declared bankruptcy -- of a sort. It was a kind of technological bankruptcy. This is the the tale of that decision but to find its roots I need to take you back to a time before I'd come to this realization. A time when, for me, technology could solve all of my problems. This goes back years -- though I'm not sure how many at this point. For some time I've been battling my way through the jungle of productivity tools. Apps, sites, systems, tricks, life hacks, [thought technologies](http://www.maxedmands.com/notes/2014/07/20/interesting-concepts.html), and anything else you can imagine. Early in 2016 I committed to picking a tool and sticking with it. The app I chose was [Todoist](https://en.todoist.com/web). This was far and away the best tool I'd used because…
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Getting Started with Hyper-V on Windows 10

Getting Started with Hyper-V on Windows 10

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I've recently moved to Windows 10 after about a decade swimming in the Apple Kool-aid. While I've not been away from Windows entirely (I use it at work) I haven't spent any time exploring some of the newer technologies introduced by the Redmond crew in the last few years. Something that comes as a feature for the Pro and Enterprise versions of Windows 10 is Microsoft's VM Hypervisor technology Hyper-V. If you're not familiar with it, this is comparable to something like Oracle's VirtualBox. One of the biggest reasons to use Hyper-V if you have a version of Windows that supports it is the fact that you will get a bit better performance of your VMs because the system has deep integration with the Windows OS. Another is the Hyper-V…
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Think Different(ly)

Articles
In a recent conversation with [Knightwise][kw] we were musing that it doesn't seem that it's very long since we were both ragging on Dave to get off Windows and get a Mac. Today we're both seriously entertaining the possibility that our next primary computing device might be running an OS from Redmond. What changed? Has Windows gotten that much better? Yes. It's undeniably better. But we're also different. And Apple is different. I think when we switched to the Mac we saw it as the Valhalla of everything we were looking for. A better system with a unix terminal which would give us the best of both worlds: open source, and a first-class GUI driven OS. In a lot of ways the Mac hasn't progressed since the Intel transition. Sure…
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Mac vs. PC :: Will my next computer be a Mac?

Articles
It's been about two and a half years since I made the switch from being a dedicated Windows user to [buying my first Mac](//kdmurray.com/2006/09/macbook-day-1/). I have really enjoyed my MacBook and wanted to take a few moments to discuss some of the differences and similarities I've found with the Mac ownership experience, compared to my earlier (and ongoing) experiences with the Windows platform. **Marketing and Markets** Both [Windows](http://blogs.computerworld.com/five_reasons_why_vista_beats_mac_os_x) and [Mac](http://www.tuaw.com/2008/03/24/why-the-mac-is-better-than-the-pc-crapware/) [enthusiasts](http://apcmag.com/15_reasons_macs_are_still_better_than_windows.htm) love to [evangelize](http://mac.elated.com/2008/12/12/10-ways-that-windows-is-better-than-mac-os/) their platform of choice.  It's human nature, we all want people to know how smart we are for choosing the best of what's available. As is often the case with most of these "[holy wars](https://www.google.ca/search?q=mac windows holy war)" the smaller market tends to be more vocal, and more likely to point out all the flaws in…
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AnkhSVN and Visual Studio 2008

Articles
[![ankhsvn](http://kdmurray.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/ankhsvn11.gif "ankhsvn")](http://kdmurray.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/ankhsvn11.gif)Source control is one of those things that developers get really polarized about.  Most agree that having source control on projects is a necessity, but that's typically were the similarities end.  Some folks are of the mind that every line of code, however insignificant, [should be under source control](http://stackoverflow.com/questions/132520/good-excuses-not-to-use-version-control).  This provides records of what was written, and a reference for things that were done in the past.  Others believe that source control should be reserved for "real" projects, things that are deliverables for customers, or products to be released to real-world environments.  I really don't want to get into this debate tonight, so I'm going to stick to the technology. I was wanting to get some source control in place for a few of my personal projects.  I chose…
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Command Line 101 – Windows: Backup, Remote Desktop and More

Articles
I've been working on some things for work recently which have me deeply buried in the Windows command line again, both writing applications and scripting/automating actions against various systems on our network. **Backup your Files to a Remote Computer** One of the things we all need to do is keep backups of our data.  It's easy enough to re-install your OS and all your apps, but if your system dies and you lose your data, the results can be heartbreaking to say the least.  So be proactive and schedule yourself a backup using xcopy. **xcopy "c:documents and settings<username>My Documents" "f:<username>" /C /D /E /H /Y** So lets examine what this does.  Normally the copy command can only copy single files, and doesn't handle large file structures very gracefully. This is…
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AntiVirus software lacking effectiveness

Articles
At the recent [AusCERT 2006 Conference](http://conference.auscert.org.au/conf2006/), a survey was published by Graham Ingram general manager of the [Australian Computer Emergency Response Team](http://auscert.org.au/) (AusCERT) which discussed the effectiveness of several leading anti-virus products.  The survey states that an average of 8 in 10 threats are getting through the protection that these products provide. Some research done by ZDNet Australia's Munir Kotadia in a [series of articles](http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/security/soa/Eighty_percent_of_new_malware_defeats_antivirus/0,2000061744,39263949,00.htm) notes that the three top products (by market share) in 2005 were Symantec's Norton Antivirus, Mcafee Virusscan and Trend Micro VirusDefense.  If the survey results are accurate, or even partially accurate, that could mean that running even two of these security defense products at once may only provide a 20%-40% protection.  Not exactly a comforting thought. So where does this leave us?  Do we need to install…
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