Home Server Build part 5 – DNS Basics (Ubuntu School)

Articles
Once the server has been configured one major "infrastructure" task remains - setting up DNS. This is where those clever names you thought up back in [the "prerequisites" stage](http://kdmurray.net/2012/06/23/home-server-build-part-3-os-installation-ubuntu-school/) come into play. Strictly speaking DNS isn't required for everything else to work properly, but it's one of those things that makes the overall solution that much more elegant. When you're connecting to various components in your network it's so much nicer to refer to them by name rather than simply by IP address. A key piece of information you'll want to keep close at hand is the Webmin [BIND module](http://doxfer.webmin.com/Webmin/BINDDNSServer) documentation. This provides an easy-to-understand guide to managing DNS using [BIND](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BIND) and Webmin. It was key to me being able to complete this tutorial. ### Create the Domain's Master Record…
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Ubuntu School – Get Rolling with Webmin on Ubuntu Server 11.10

Projects
Even if some Linux purists would have you believe the command-line is the only way to go, the pragmatist in me will always take an appropriate GUI over a complicated command-line any day. You can run a lot of powerful services for your home network using one or more Ubuntu server machines. With the right tools you don't need to be a Linux expert to make that happen. The tool of choice is [Webmin](http://webmin.com/ "Webmin"). This is a set of web-based tools which allow you to control virtually every piece of server-side software on you Ubuntu server. The GUI is intuitive and straight-forward, the documentation is excellent, and the project is under active development. Because Webmin isn't in the standard repositories you will have to do a couple of quick…
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Moving? Redirect with htaccess and 301

Articles
If you've ever moved your site from one server to another, or changed domain names you know how difficult it can be to redirect all your old traffic to the new location. Here's a quick trick to make the transition totally seamless. `Redirect 301 / http://kdmurray.com/` This will redirect every URL beneath the root (" / ") to it's corresponding URL at mynewsite.net. So if you had a blog post from a couple of years ago that you migrated to the new domain, you can redirect the old URLs (which may have been cached in a search engine) to the new site to drive all that traffic to where it should be going. In addition the 301 code (see [HTTP 301](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_301)) will tell web browsers & search engines that the…
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